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The Biggest Loser's DOLVETTE

He calls Atlanta home, Dolvette of NBC's The Biggest Loser, stopped by Conn TV Studios to talk about his new lifestyle book about balance, not diet! You don't want to miss what he says about emotion, details, health and much much more. 

Dog treat recall expanded

Dog treat recall expanded

(WXIA) -- Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary W. Black recently issued a warning for pet owners about dog treats that may be contaminated with salmonella.

RELATED | FDA issues warning about jerky treats for pets

Bailey's Choice Pet Treats, a Waleska-based company, is recalling packages of chicken treats with lot number 132881 and an expiration date of February 2014.

Five-ounce bags of chicken jerky with lot number "Jun 5 2013" have also been recalled.

The recall was expanded Wednesday to include seven more packages of treats, including:

Sisters to undergo double mastectomies

Sisters to undergo double mastectomies

ATLANTA -- The nation is still buzzing about Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy.

In a New York Times piece, the 37-year-old actress explained she spent the last three months undergoing and recovering from the procedure. She made her decision after testing positive for one of the BRCA genes.

RELATED | 11Alive's Valerie Hoff and the Pink Ladies

Two Atlanta sisters can relate all too well to Jolie's choice.

Amy Rice, a 21-year-old senior at Kennesaw State University, and her 24-year-old sister Lauren Rice Brewer, a University of Georgia graduate, tested positive for the same gene. Both young women will have double mastectomies this week.

The Autism Gap: The fight for insurance

The Autism Gap: The fight for insurance

ATLANTA -- Eight year old Ava Bullard is playing with her sisters, riding their bikes on their long country driveway. It is a simple act that defies those who said she would never talk, those who said she wouldn't function in the real world.

Ava was not a typical baby, or toddler.

Her mother Anna says, "You couldn't interact with her."

MORE | Complete coverage of The Autism Gap

Ava did not play with toys. Did not speak. Could not dress herself. Did not interact with her parents or sisters. Slept two hours a night. She was in her own world.

Anna says, "It's like she looked straight through me. She would just...it's like you weren't there, if you were in the room with her."

Anna Bullard took Ava from doctor to doctor for months. One doctor told the family Ava was 'just weird.'

Atlanta recruiting 5,000 volunteers for cancer study

Atlanta recruiting 5,000 volunteers for cancer study

ATLANTA -- Sixty years ago, 1 million men and women signed up for the first-ever Cancer Prevention Study. They filled out surveys every few years. And the information from those million Americans led to a dramatic discovery.

Doctor Alpa Patel with the American Cancer Society is the lead researcher on CPS3, the third generation of the cancer prevention studies.

MORE | Join the Cancer prevention Study 3

"The first study was actually set up to specifically address the question of whether not smoking caused lung cancer, and it provided the first evidence that in fact smoking is what was the causal fact, causal factor with the increase rise in lung cancer death rates we were seeing in men at that time," she said.

Researchers use dog virus to deliver vaccines

Researchers use dog virus to deliver vaccines

ATHENS, Ga. -- University of Georgia researchers are developing a method to use a virus linked to illnesses in dogs to deliver vaccines to humans.

Researchers are looking to use parainfluenza virus 5 as a mechanism to deliver vaccines to humans. The virus is linked to upper respiratory infections in dogs.

The newspaper reports the canine virus does not cause illness in humans, and researchers say they can reengineer the virus to carry and deliver specific vaccines to human immune systems. Researchers say the method is effective because human immune systems are unable to recognize the canine virus and destroy it.

Scientists have used the virus to vaccinate mice against bird flu, and say they're working toward developing vaccinations for malaria, a strain of tuberculosis and HIV.

UGA, Ga. Tech, Emory team up for malaria research

UGA, Ga. Tech, Emory team up for malaria research

ATHENS, Ga. -- The University of Georgia, Georgia Tech and Emory recently announced plans to partner to establish a comprehensive center to where research will be conducted on malaria.

According to UGA, Mary Galinski leads the Georgia consortium, which was awarded a five-year contract of up to $19.4 million to start up the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. The funding came from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The university will use $2 million from a subcontract to collect and research data.

"The combined expertise of the consortium partners makes MaHPIC uniquely equipped to address issues related to pathogens that cause malaria, a disease that involves complex interactions between hosts and parasites," UGA professor of genetics Jessica Kissinger, MaHPIC co-principal investigator and leader of the project's informatics team said.